Prosperity Haven Ohio

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Addiction Treatment
For Nurses

Helping Clients Identify, Address, and Heal
from Addiction & Co-Occurring Disorders

Chardon Addiction Treatment Center

Nurses are an integral part of our healthcare system. Every day, hundreds of thousands of nurses work diligently to keep patients comfortable, safe, and informed. They also perform vital duties such as extracting blood, administering medication, and conducting physical exams. Without nurses, our healthcare system would come to a screeching halt, and millions of patients would be put at risk.

Sadly, nurses face a lot of pressure at work. Much like physicians, nurses have to face death all the time and communicate bad news to grieving friends and family. They also put their physical well-being at risk by exposing themselves to communicable viruses and diseases. This was a major concern during the COVID-19 pandemic, when nurses were seen as some of the most important frontline workers helping to stem the growing tide of new cases.

Working long hours and managing the well-being of dozens of patients each day can be extremely taxing on nurses. And despite the long hours, many nurses struggle with the idea of taking time off, especially if their place of work is understaffed. By some calculations, as many as 22 out of every 100 hospitals in the United States are short-staffed, making it more and more difficult for nurses to request time off. The intensity of a nurse’s work schedule can often lead to anxiety, depression, burnout, and in many cases, substance abuse.

If you or a loved one is a nurse, you don’t need to search for help any longer. At Prosperity Haven, we offer discrete, specialized drug and alcohol treatment for nurses. Our programs address the specific needs and unique experiences of medical professionals working in high-stress environments. Continue reading to learn more about inpatient drug and alcohol rehab for nurses and to see how it could save you or someone important in your life.

Four pictures of a man sitting in a living room, possibly depicting his journey through an outpatient program at a men's only rehab center.

Why Nurses With Addiction Need Specialized Care

Substance abuse among nurses is an important topic that often gets overlooked. There is insufficient data to know exactly how prevalent drug addiction is among nurses. That said, recent estimates put the rate of nurses with substance abuse problems as high as 20%.[1] This means that 1 in 5 nurses could be struggling with a substance use disorder right now.

While the prevalence of addiction among nurses is important, it’s also important to examine the underlying reasons why there’s a connection between nurses and substance abuse. Some recent factors, such as the stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, may have led to a temporary spike in drug addiction among nurses, but there are also more lasting causal factors to consider.

Treatment of drug addiction among nurses has to be incredibly delicate, discrete, and nuanced. Part of the reason why data related to the prevalence of substance abuse among nurses is scarce is that many nurses are afraid to come forward about their addictions. Hospitals and clinics may take punitive action against nurses who abuse drugs or alcohol, and the exposure of a substance use disorder could temporarily or permanently affect a nurse’s reputation. For this reason, addiction treatment for nurses must be extremely private.

Addiction treatment for nurses must also address the underlying causes of substance abuse. For many nurses, it’s the constant stress of working long hours and being exposed to illness and death that leads to substance abuse. However, the primary cause can also be influenced by the environment. There are many different types of nurses, and therefore many reasons why nurses may try to escape work-related stress with drugs or alcohol.

Here are just a few of the most common types of nurses that must be considered when crafting a drug and alcohol rehab program:

  • Nurse practitioner
  • Registered nurse
  • Licensed practical nurse
  • Nurse anesthetist
  • Oncology nurse
  • Pediatric nurse
  • Critical care nurse
  • Surgical nurse

This does not include all types of nurses, but it does include a wide variety of nursing jobs that often have different responsibilities and involve unique working environments. For instance, a pediatric nurse may struggle with attending to sick children day in and day out, while a critical care nurse may have intense anxiety as a result of dealing with life-or-death situations so frequently. But regardless of the specialization or work environment, nurses are often more likely to experience stress-related mental health issues and substance abuse than the general population.

What is Dual Diagnosis?Why Nurses With Addiction Need Specialized Care

Substance abuse among nurses is an important topic that often gets overlooked. There is insufficient data to know exactly how prevalent drug addiction is among nurses. That said, recent estimates put the rate of nurses with substance abuse problems as high as 20%.[1] This means that 1 in 5 nurses could be struggling with a substance use disorder right now.

While the prevalence of addiction among nurses is important, it’s also important to examine the underlying reasons why there’s a connection between nurses and substance abuse. Some recent factors, such as the stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, may have led to a temporary spike in drug addiction among nurses, but there are also more lasting causal factors to consider.

Treatment of drug addiction among nurses has to be incredibly delicate, discrete, and nuanced. Part of the reason why data related to the prevalence of substance abuse among nurses is scarce is that many nurses are afraid to come forward about their addictions. Hospitals and clinics may take punitive action against nurses who abuse drugs or alcohol, and the exposure of a substance use disorder could temporarily or permanently affect a nurse’s reputation. For this reason, addiction treatment for nurses must be extremely private.

Addiction treatment for nurses must also address the underlying causes of substance abuse. For many nurses, it’s the constant stress of working long hours and being exposed to illness and death that leads to substance abuse. However, the primary cause can also be influenced by the environment. There are many different types of nurses, and therefore many reasons why nurses may try to escape work-related stress with drugs or alcohol.

Here are just a few of the most common types of nurses that must be considered when crafting a drug and alcohol rehab program:

  • Nurse practitioner
  • Registered nurse
  • Licensed practical nurse
  • Nurse anesthetist
  • Oncology nurse
  • Pediatric nurse
  • Critical care nurse
  • Surgical nurse

This does not include all types of nurses, but it does include a wide variety of nursing jobs that often have different responsibilities and involve unique working environments. For instance, a pediatric nurse may struggle with attending to sick children day in and day out, while a critical care nurse may have intense anxiety as a result of dealing with life-or-death situations so frequently. But regardless of the specialization or work environment, nurses are often more likely to experience stress-related mental health issues and substance abuse than the general population.

Co-occurring Disorders Treatment

What Is Addiction Treatment For Nurses?

At Prosperity Haven, we utilize a multi-faceted approach involving detoxification, individual therapy, group therapy, and holistic healing. We also use specialized techniques and care to focus on the unique needs of nurses, targeting common issues like heavy workloads, work-related trauma, and prescription drug abuse.

Heavy Workload

As previously mentioned, nurses frequently work very long shifts. Depending on the job requirements, some nurses may need to be on call 24 hours a day and work two or more shifts in a row. This can make life as a nurse extremely difficult and stressful. Not only is it a very heavy workload with long, exhausting hours, but it also makes it difficult to plan for other aspects of life, like family and personal needs.

Due to the stressful nature of the work, many nurses have to deal with exhaustion and mental health issues. By some estimates, 2 out of every 3 nurses experience burnout.[2] Not only does burnout make it harder to fulfill work duties properly, but it also greatly increases the chances of anxiety, depression, and even substance abuse.

Work-Related Trauma

By some estimates, 1 out of every 4 nurses develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during their careers. The outlook is even worse for critical care nurses, with research indicating that nearly half of nurses in critical care units meet the criteria for PTSD.[3] This is because nurses are constantly dealing with high-stress situations, from drug overdoses to cardiac arrest. Even one traumatic event at work can trigger debilitating symptoms related to an anxiety disorder, depression, or PTSD, all of which increase the chances of substance abuse.

Prescription Drug Abuse

Like physicians, nurses have much easier access to prescription medication than people working outside of the healthcare system. Access is often a major factor when evaluating the likelihood of a person engaging in substance abuse. Since nurses often manage medication for patients on a daily basis, they are at a greater risk of misusing drugs and developing an addiction to prescription drugs. Even if a nurse is able to temporarily overcome their addiction, he or she will be exposed to constant triggers at work, which greatly increases the chance of a relapse.

Co-occurring Disorders Treatment

Co-occurring Disorders TreatmentWhat Is Addiction Treatment For Nurses?

At Prosperity Haven, we utilize a multi-faceted approach involving detoxification, individual therapy, group therapy, and holistic healing. We also use specialized techniques and care to focus on the unique needs of nurses, targeting common issues like heavy workloads, work-related trauma, and prescription drug abuse.

Heavy Workload

As previously mentioned, nurses frequently work very long shifts. Depending on the job requirements, some nurses may need to be on call 24 hours a day and work two or more shifts in a row. This can make life as a nurse extremely difficult and stressful. Not only is it a very heavy workload with long, exhausting hours, but it also makes it difficult to plan for other aspects of life, like family and personal needs.

Due to the stressful nature of the work, many nurses have to deal with exhaustion and mental health issues. By some estimates, 2 out of every 3 nurses experience burnout.[2] Not only does burnout make it harder to fulfill work duties properly, but it also greatly increases the chances of anxiety, depression, and even substance abuse.

Work-Related Trauma

By some estimates, 1 out of every 4 nurses develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during their careers. The outlook is even worse for critical care nurses, with research indicating that nearly half of nurses in critical care units meet the criteria for PTSD.[3] This is because nurses are constantly dealing with high-stress situations, from drug overdoses to cardiac arrest. Even one traumatic event at work can trigger debilitating symptoms related to an anxiety disorder, depression, or PTSD, all of which increase the chances of substance abuse.

Prescription Drug Abuse

Like physicians, nurses have much easier access to prescription medication than people working outside of the healthcare system. Access is often a major factor when evaluating the likelihood of a person engaging in substance abuse. Since nurses often manage medication for patients on a daily basis, they are at a greater risk of misusing drugs and developing an addiction to prescription drugs. Even if a nurse is able to temporarily overcome their addiction, he or she will be exposed to constant triggers at work, which greatly increases the chance of a relapse.

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Prosperity Haven - Drug & Alcohol Rehab For Nurses in Ohio

At Prosperity Haven, we strive to provide nurses and other professionals in the medical field with a safe, comfortable, private, and discrete environment in which to recover. Our trained substance abuse counselors work to understand the unique circumstances of your case and develop a treatment plan that fits your needs. At the same time, checking into Prosperity Haven can give you a much-needed break from the stresses of your work. By getting help at Prosperity Haven in Chardon, Ohio, you can access the care you need without putting your career at risk.

Want to learn more about alcohol and drug rehab for nurses? Reach out to the experts at Prosperity Haven today.

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