Prosperity Haven

Methamphetamine Addiction
Treatment and Recovery
in Chardon, OH

Methamphetamine Addiction Treatment
and Recovery
in Chardon, OH

Overview:
Chardon Methamphetamine Abuse & Addiction Recovery

Ohio has a serious problem with methamphetamine abuse: there has been a 1,600% increase in methamphetamines seized in Ohio from 2015 to 2019, indicating a massive increase in its use [1]. Considering the fact that methamphetamines and related stimulants are involved in 20% of drug overdose deaths, it’s clear that methamphetamine addiction can’t be taken lightly [2].

At Prosperity Haven, we intend to keep our clients and their loved ones informed about the dangers of their addiction, and how we can help them overcome it. Below, you can read more about this dangerous drug, including how to identify abuse, its long-term effects, its withdrawal symptoms, and how our methamphetamine addiction treatment programming can give our clients a new lease on life.

What is Methamphetamine?

What is Methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine, also known as “crystal meth” or just, “meth,” is a powerful stimulant that causes the brain to release a significant amount of dopamine very quickly. Dopamine is a chemical that causes feelings of euphoria, and it’s linked to the brain’s reward system. Meth overloads the brain with dopamine, causing a feeling of increased energy, decreased appetite, and clear-headedness.

In most cases, methamphetamine is illegally produced and used, and is either smoked, ingested, snorted, or injected. While the high from methamphetamine is intense, it fades rapidly and has intense side effects and withdrawal symptoms, leading to further abuse and addiction.

What is Methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine, also known as “crystal meth” or just, “meth,” is a powerful stimulant that causes the brain to release a significant amount of dopamine very quickly. Dopamine is a chemical that causes feelings of euphoria, and it’s linked to the brain’s reward system. Meth overloads the brain with dopamine, causing a feeling of increased energy, decreased appetite, and clear-headedness.

In most cases, methamphetamine is illegally produced and used, and is either smoked, ingested, snorted, or injected. While the high from methamphetamine is intense, it fades rapidly and has intense side effects and withdrawal symptoms, leading to further abuse and addiction.

  • OTHER TYPES OF AMPHETAMINES:

Methamphetamine is in a class of drugs called amphetamines, stimulants mostly used to treat ADHD:

  • Adderall
  • Concerta
  • Dexedrine
  • Vyvanse
  • Focalin
  • Metadate
  • Methylin
  • Ritalin

While methamphetamine is more addictive than these drugs, because it is more powerful and others take longer to start and stop working, all amphetamines come with some risk of abuse and addiction. Any amphetamine also has the potential to lead to “stimulant psychosis,” a mental disorder with psychotic symptoms. In most cases, it’s caused by overdose, but overuse can trigger it, and leads to schizophrenia in roughly 1 in 5 cases [3]. Stimulant psychosis is much more common in methamphetamine abusers than other amphetamine users.

Signs and Symptoms of Methamphetamine Addiction

Methamphetamine use typically comes in two phases, “binge” and “crash.” These are when someone with an addiction uses a lot of methamphetamine in a short period to capitalize on its brief high, then stops using it during times when their body demands a break, they pass out, or they run out. There are also “runs,” where someone abusing methamphetamine foregoes sleep and food for multiple days while continuing heavy meth use.

Besides these distinct cycles, someone abusing methamphetamine may exhibit these symptoms:

  • Hyperactivity: Greater energy levels, doing a lot in a short period of time, increased talkativeness, rambling
  • Restlessness: Erratic gestures, twitching, rapid eye movement with dilated pupils, grinding teeth, faster breathing, increased blood pressure or heartbeat
  • Emotional problems: Mood swings, euphoria, anger, paranoia
  • Dangerous behaviors: Reckless behaviors like driving irresponsibly; borrowing, selling, or stealing to get money or drugs; violent acts
  • Physical illness: Frequently becoming sick, decreased appetite, unhealthy fluctuations in body temperature
  • Visible indicators: Poor hygiene, dull skin, weight loss, aged appearance, dental issues collectively called “meth mouth,” open sores from scratching skin (caused by itchiness and hallucinations of things crawling on the skin)
Meth Addiction Symptoms

Besides these distinct cycles, someone abusing methamphetamine may exhibit these symptoms:

  • Hyperactivity: Greater energy levels, doing a lot in a short period of time, increased talkativeness, rambling
  • Restlessness: Erratic gestures, twitching, rapid eye movement with dilated pupils, grinding teeth, faster breathing, increased blood pressure or heartbeat
  • Emotional problems: Mood swings, euphoria, anger, paranoia
  • Dangerous behaviors: Reckless behaviors like driving irresponsibly; borrowing, selling, or stealing to get money or drugs; violent acts
  • Physical illness: Frequently becoming sick, decreased appetite, unhealthy fluctuations in body temperature
  • Visible indicators: Poor hygiene, dull skin, weight loss, aged appearance, dental issues collectively called “meth mouth,” open sores from scratching skin (caused by itchiness and hallucinations of things crawling on the skin)

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Long-Term Meth Abuse Effects

Long-Term Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse
and Addiction

Long-Term
Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse and Addiction

Meth wreaks havoc on the body over time. It can badly damage essential organs, and because it weakens the immune system, it leads to an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis B and C. Methamphetamine abuse can also lead to severe weight loss, malnutrition, dangerous dehydration, and permanent dental problems.

Methamphetamine also actively changes the brain’s function. This can lead to impaired cognitive functioning, including poor coordination, difficulty learning, confusion, and memory loss. It can also cause long-term or permanent mental illnesses including anxiety, paranoia, chronic insomnia, and hallucinations.

Long-Term Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse and Addiction

Meth wreaks havoc on the body over time. It can badly damage essential organs, and because it weakens the immune system, it leads to an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis B and C. Methamphetamine abuse can also lead to severe weight loss, malnutrition, dangerous dehydration, and permanent dental problems.

Methamphetamine also actively changes the brain’s function. This can lead to impaired cognitive functioning, including poor coordination, difficulty learning, confusion, and memory loss. It can also cause long-term or permanent mental illnesses including anxiety, paranoia, chronic insomnia, and hallucinations.

Methamphetamine Detox and Withdrawal

Some people try to undergo methamphetamine detox and withdrawal on their own. This can not only be extremely uncomfortable, but also, it lowers the odds of successful recovery. The withdrawal period is most intense during the first 24 hours after using meth, but usually continues for anywhere from 1-4 weeks.

Some methamphetamine withdrawal symptoms can last even longer — anhedonia, for example, is a difficulty feeling pleasure caused by dopamine receptor damage from abusing methamphetamines. This can last as long as two years.

The psychological side-effects of methamphetamine use become worse during withdrawal, and are accompanied by the exhaustion, hunger, and depression that drug abuse was repressing. Dehydration and temperature fluctuations can result as well, which are health risks on their own, but combined with other physical symptoms, powerful cravings, and mental struggles, this can all combine to lead to relapse. Relapse can be deadly during withdrawal, because the body’s tolerance to methamphetamine can change even just a few days after the user has stopped taking it.

Methamphetamine Detox and Withdrawal

Methamphetamine Detox and Withdrawal

Some people try to undergo methamphetamine detox and withdrawal on their own. This can not only be extremely uncomfortable, but also, it lowers the odds of successful recovery. The withdrawal period is most intense during the first 24 hours after using meth, but usually continues for anywhere from 1-4 weeks.

Some methamphetamine withdrawal symptoms can last even longer — anhedonia, for example, is a difficulty feeling pleasure caused by dopamine receptor damage from abusing methamphetamines. This can last as long as two years.

The psychological side-effects of methamphetamine use become worse during withdrawal, and are accompanied by the exhaustion, hunger, and depression that drug abuse was repressing. Dehydration and temperature fluctuations can result as well, which are health risks on their own, but combined with other physical symptoms, powerful cravings, and mental struggles, this can all combine to lead to relapse. Relapse can be deadly during withdrawal, because the body’s tolerance to methamphetamine can change even just a few days after the user has stopped taking it.

New Beginnings Start Here

Take the First Step – Reach Out to Us Today

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Reach Out to Us Today

Methamphetamine Addiction Treatment
Near Cleveland, OH

Methamphetamine
Addiction Treatment
Near Cleveland, OH

Methamphetamine Addiction Treatment Near Cleveland, OH

Methamphetamine addiction is difficult to overcome, and its long-term withdrawal symptoms and recovery can be just as arduous. That’s where our team at Prosperity Haven comes in. We offer one-on-one substance abuse counseling to help our clients understand what unmet needs they were trying to cover up with methamphetamine use, as well as nature-based therapies that help clients heal from the physical damage caused by methamphetamine abuse and give them the strength to manage demanding parts of recovery.

Methamphetamine addiction can be lonely and seem insurmountable, but with our small group therapies and welcoming staff, we’re proud to help clients achieve a healthier, happier life of sobriety and recovery. To learn more about our methamphetamine addiction treatment, call Prosperity Haven at
(440) 253-9915 today.