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Understanding and Treating the Most Common Co-Occurring Disorders in Cleveland

Co-occurring Disorders

Mental illness and addiction often go hand-in-hand — so frequently, in fact, that most addiction treatment now also calls for therapy for co-occurring disorders (also called dual diagnoses). Nearly one third of all people with any mood disorder also have a substance use disorder (SUD). [1] Whether the mental illness leads to the SUD, or vice versa, they’re heavily linked.

Below, you can learn more about the most common co-occurring disorders, and how Prosperity Haven’s dual diagnosis treatment programs near Cleveland can help clients heal from each.

1.) Anxiety

Some studies have found that an astronomical two-thirds of drug use disorders, and over half of alcohol use disorders, were preceded by an anxiety disorder. [2] People who deal with constant stress often turn to substance abuse, either with the goal of finding relief from their fears, or to suppress the unresolved anxiety long enough to “function” as they’re expected to.

Treating anxiety and addiction as co-occurring disorders can be a delicate balance, because we want to improve a client’s ability to handle anxiety without pushing them to do more than they’re ready to. At Prosperity Haven, we use a combination of holistic treatments alongside our dedicated, evidence-based therapies to help the client manage underlying anxiety and panic attacks in healthier, and even more effective, ways.

2.) Depression

Between 15-20% of people with depression have an alcohol or drug use disorder. [1] Many substances can cause serious depression, especially during withdrawal, but many people also struggle to find activities or relationships that fulfill their needs, and instead turn to drug and alcohol abuse to feel good, or at least better for a few hours.

What clients struggling with depression and addiction are really looking for often isn’t an escape, it’s proper fulfillment. We help clients understand their unmet needs in individualized dual diagnosis therapy, and ways they can lift their mood — such as mindfulness practices, or healthier diets and sleep schedules — and fulfill those unmet needs in healthier, more sustainable ways.

3.) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

PTSD can make someone up to four times more likely to develop a SUD. [3] While many people believe that “trauma” only comes from wars or violent abuse, shared experiences like the expected loss of a loved one can also lead to trauma. These memories cause unresolvable emotions, and while substance abuse doesn’t fix them, it provides an escape for some time.

Trauma therapy is an extremely common co-occurring disorder treatment, as many people are trying to cope with trauma, but don’t recognize that’s what they’re doing. PTSD treatment often involves identifying traumas and their triggers, managing trauma reactions through dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) and peaceful naturopathic therapies, and beginning the process of overcoming traumas.

4.) Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder leads to substance abuse more often than it doesn’t — an astonishing 56% of people with bipolar disorder also have a lifetime SUD. [1] The “manic” episodes involved in bipolar disorder often lead to reckless behaviors including substance abuse, while “depressive” episodes may find the person suffering from bipolar disorder turning to drugs or alcohol to escape their feelings.

Because bipolar disorder causes impulsive thinking and actions, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and group therapy can help the client manage difficult thoughts and increase accountability, if not to themselves than to others. Calming and mood-lifting holistic therapies also help the client return to a more level state-of-mind after moving to an extreme.

5.) Personality Disorders

There are many different personality disorders, and each of them has a unique relationship to addiction. Antisocial Personality Disorder is characterized by a disregard for right and wrong, and for the feelings of others, which can often lead to substance abuse without concern for consequences. People with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), meanwhile, have great difficulty controlling their thinking, behaviors, and relationships, and turn to substances during impulsive periods of extreme emotion.

Treatment looks different from personality disorder to personality disorder, especially because in many cases, a personality disorder’s symptoms must be managed before trying to address issues rooted so deeply in a client’s very personality. As with other common co-occurring disorders, we often turn to a combination of evidence-based therapies to help the client understand and regulate their unhealthy thoughts, and holistic therapies that help the client find peace and recenter when life is difficult.

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Cleveland Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment at Prosperity Haven

Mental disorders and substance abuse disorders often occur together, and that’s why we offer specialized and individualized co-occurring disorder therapy to treat them in conjunction with one another. At our Cleveland-area addiction treatment center, our clients will find not only a path forward with us, but lasting support to help them get on their feet and on their way to a happier, healthier, and sober life in recovery.

To learn more about co-occurring disorder treatment at Prosperity Haven, please call us at (440) 253-9915 today.

The Most Common Dual Diagnosis Cleveland

Understanding and Treating the Most Common Co-Occurring Disorders in Cleveland

Mental illness and addiction often go hand-in-hand — so frequently, in fact, that most addiction treatment now also calls for therapy for co-occurring disorders (also called dual diagnoses). Nearly one third of all people with any mood disorder also have a substance use disorder (SUD). [1] Whether the mental illness leads to the SUD, or vice versa, they’re heavily linked.

Below, you can learn more about the most common co-occurring disorders, and how Prosperity Haven’s dual diagnosis treatment programs near Cleveland can help clients heal from each.

ADDERALL ABUSE IN CLEVELAND: ARE COLLEGE STUDENTS AT RISK?

In a world full of distractions, it can be harder than ever to concentrate. We often feel overloaded, overstimulated, and overwhelmed by the amount of information available to us. Then, when you add the pressure of college courses, internships, and post-graduation job hunting, it’s no wonder that many college students and young professionals have turned to drugs like Adderall to improve their focus and relieve fatigue.

But, this drug (and those similar to it) isn’t the cure-all that many think it is, and when not taken as prescribed, Adderall use can lead to dependence and addiction.

What is Adderall?

Adderall has the potential to improve a person’s quality of life when prescribed and used as directed. As a stimulant, Adderall helps people with ADHD increase their focus and function better in their day-to-day lives, and it helps reduce daytime sleepiness for people struggling with narcolepsy.

That being said, Adderall is a habit-forming drug, and its use should be closely monitored by a medical professional, preferably the doctor who prescribed it. It’s not considered to be among the most addictive controlled substances, but addiction can definitely develop with long-term abuse.

WHY ARE COLLEGE STUDENTS AT GREATER RISK FOR ADDERALL ABUSE?

The pressure to perform well on papers and exams is greater than ever, and sometimes college students will begin looking for shortcuts to success. As a result, they are twice as likely to abuse Adderall than their non-student peers of the same age group [1]. Some students who take Adderall without a prescription claim it even helps them retain more information and boosts their mental capacity when studying. There are other side effects that aid this mentality, such as the way Adderall suppresses appetite, allowing students to study longer without having to stop to eat.

In addition to helping students stay up late to cram for exams, Adderall is also taken as a “party drug” in a misguided attempt to offset the effects of alcohol to allow for a longer night of drinking. Alcohol is a depressant and Adderall a stimulant, so the logic is that they would cancel each other out. This isn’t the reality, though. The tendency to feel tired when drinking is actually a mechanism that helps avoid drinking too much. Adderall can override this, making it easier to reach dangerous levels of consumption, alcohol poisoning, and overdose.

The Side Effects of Adderall Addiction

Adderall is often thought to be a “safe” drug because it’s prescribed by doctors, but the reality is that taking Adderall without the oversight of a medical professional can lead to addiction. The danger is not only the addiction in itself, but the fact that it can easily go undetected: a person abusing Adderall may just seem like they have more focus and motivation, but other symptoms can include:

  • Increased sociability, talkativeness, and racing thoughts
  • Illusions of intense wellbeing or invincibility
  • Nervousness, impatience, excitement, anxiety, and panic
  • Sudden desire to work more often
  • Weight loss or malnutrition
  • Changes in levels of sexual interest
  • Uncontrollable shaking and verbal or muscular tics
  • Increased heart rate and exhaustion

Some Adderall abusers take part in “doctor shopping”, which is the name used to describe the act of trying to find a doctor who will prescribe medications without doing the necessary screening for proper diagnosis of a qualifying condition.

Misuse of Adderall can lead a person to build up a tolerance to the drug and attempting to stop taking it will lead to withdrawal symptoms that can be dangerous or even deadly. Long-term Adderall abuse can lead to sleep difficulties, lack of motivation, depression, mood swings, hallucinations, suicidal thoughts, and more.

Have You Talked to Your Children About Adderall Abuse?

Adderall abuse may mask the real underlying problem, because in social and academic circles, this newfound energy, focus, and productivity may be viewed as a good thing. But just because Adderall abuse is common among students doesn’t make it any less dangerous.

If you suspect that a loved one is struggling with Adderall abuse, it’s never too soon to talk to them about the risks of abusing drugs of any kind. If you need to learn about the resources available to you, Prosperity Haven can help. Call 440-253-9915 today to learn about your options for treatment.

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