Prosperity Haven

Opioid Addiction Treatment
and Recovery in Chardon, OH

Overview:
Chardon Opioid Abuse & Addiction Recovery

In 2017, over 4,000 people died of opioid overdose, which surpassed motor vehicle crashes as the largest cause of injury-related deaths in Ohio for the first time ever. [1]. While opioid-related deaths fell across the board by almost a third in 2018, due in part to the state government-mandated “RecoveryOhio” initiative [2], our state continues to struggle with the country’s ongoing opioid crisis.

Here at Prosperity Haven, we believe that education is the first step towards overcoming this crisis. Below you can brush up on opioids: what they are, how their abuse affects the user, why they’re so difficult to quit, and ways our Cleveland-area opioid addiction treatment can empower clients to get sober and live a healthier life in recovery.

What is Opioid?

What Are Opioids?

Opioids, also called narcotics, are an analgesic (pain relieving) class of drugs. This includes heroin, the extremely potent fentanyl, and prescription opioids such as oxycodone (OxyContin) and hydrocodone (Vicodin).

Opioids bind to opioid receptors in the central nervous system of the brain, which are involved in the production of dopamine, a chemical that causes feelings of pleasure when released. When prescribed by a doctor, used for a limited time, and taken in limited doses as directed, opioids can be a safe and effective pain reliever.

Many people lose access to their prescription opioids eventually, either through the prescription itself running out or for financial reasons. Some of these people may illegally acquire prescription opioids or move on to more affordable, and more dangerous, “street” alternatives like heroin and fentanyl.

What Are Opioids?

Opioids, also called narcotics, are an analgesic (pain relieving) class of drugs. This includes heroin, the extremely potent fentanyl, and prescription opioids such as oxycodone (OxyContin) and hydrocodone (Vicodin).

Opioids bind to opioid receptors in the central nervous system of the brain, which are involved in the production of dopamine, a chemical that causes feelings of pleasure when released. When prescribed by a doctor, used for a limited time, and taken in limited doses as directed, opioids can be a safe and effective pain reliever.

Many people lose access to their prescription opioids eventually, either through the prescription itself running out or for financial reasons. Some of these people may illegally acquire prescription opioids or move on to more affordable, and more dangerous, “street” alternatives like heroin and fentanyl.

Opiates vs. Opioids:
What’s the Difference?

You’ll likely hear “opioids” and “opiates” used interchangeably, but there is a difference. “Opiates” refers only to naturally-derived forms of the substance — like morphine and codeine — while “opioids” describes any substance that acts on opioid receptors in the central nervous system.

Other types of opioids are either “semi-synthetic”, made in a lab but derived from natural opiates, or “fully-synthetic” — these are drugs that mimic natural opiates’ effects but are made through artificial means.

Differences of Opioid and Opiates

Opiates vs. Opioids: What’s the Difference?

You’ll likely hear “opioids” and “opiates” used interchangeably, but there is a difference. “Opiates” refers only to naturally-derived forms of the substance — like morphine and codeine — while “opioids” describes any substance that acts on opioid receptors in the central nervous system.

Other types of opioids are either “semi-synthetic”, made in a lab but derived from natural opiates, or “fully-synthetic” — these are drugs that mimic natural opiates’ effects but are made through artificial means.

  • Types of Opioids:

The many types of opioids have varying degrees of potency and risk of addiction. Prescription medications like codeine or methadone are generally considered safer than morphine, which is reserved for extreme or chronic pain. Prescription opioids include:

  • Codeine
  • Hydrocodone (Vicodin)
  • Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percodan,Percocet)
  • Diphenoxylate (Lomotil)
  • Fentanyl (Duragesic)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Meperidine (Demerol)
  • Methadone
  • Morphine (Kadian, Avinza)
  • Propoxyphene (Darvon)

Non-prescription opioids are rarely used in clinical settings. Heroin is one of the most well-known examples. It’s several times stronger than morphine, the most potent of the more commonly-prescribed opioids. Fentanyl is even more powerful than heroin, and the recent trend of cutting heroin with fentanyl and selling it on the streets is something that has contributed to a number of overdose deaths.

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Symptoms of Opiate Addiction

Signs and Symptoms of Opiate Addiction

Every opiate addiction case is unique to the individual and the substance being abused. While that’s the case, some signs of opiate addiction are common between users, including:

  • Tolerance and dependency. The body needs more opiates to get the same effect, and experiences withdrawal symptoms when not using.
  • Flu-like symptoms. The user experiences nausea, dizziness, vomiting, constipation, dry mouth, itching, and sweating when not using.
  • Difficulty functioning in society. The user has new or increased problems with money, their work, and the law.
  • New social habits. The user isolates from family and friends, begins to spend time with new people, and participates less in things they once enjoyed.
  • Risk-taking. The user can’t control their use and engages in risky behaviors related to use.
  • Behavioral changes. The user alternates between low-energy and hyperactivity, experiences mood swings and depression, is often disoriented, and doesn’t keep up with their hygiene.

Signs and Symptoms of Opiate Addiction

Every opiate addiction case is unique to the individual and the substance being abused. While that’s the case, some signs of opiate addiction are common between users, including:

  • Tolerance and dependency. The body needs more opiates to get the same effect, and experiences withdrawal symptoms when not using.
  • Flu-like symptoms. The user experiences nausea, dizziness, vomiting, constipation, dry mouth, itching, and sweating when not using.
  • Difficulty functioning in society. The user has new or increased problems with money, their work, and the law.
  • New social habits. The user isolates from family and friends, begins to spend time with new people, and participates less in things they once enjoyed.
  • Risk-taking. The user can’t control their use and engages in risky behaviors related to use.
  • Behavioral changes. The user alternates between low-energy and hyperactivity, experiences mood swings and depression, is often disoriented, and doesn’t keep up with their hygiene.

Ohio Opioid Detox and Withdrawal Symptoms

How addictive a substance is usually correlates with how severe its withdrawal symptoms can be, and that’s certainly the case with opioids. At Prosperity Haven, we don’t recommend that anyone try to quit opioids without professional supervision.

Anyone who has become dependent on or addicted to pain pills will have unpleasant side effects during the “withdrawal” period after they stop using. Opioid withdrawal can be especially uncomfortable and severe, especially if done alone.

Opioid Detox Withdrawal Symptoms

Ohio Opioid Detox and Withdrawal Symptoms

How addictive a substance is usually correlates with how severe its withdrawal symptoms can be, and that’s certainly the case with opioids. At Prosperity Haven, we don’t recommend that anyone try to quit opioids without professional supervision.

Anyone who has become dependent on or addicted to pain pills will have unpleasant side effects during the “withdrawal” period after they stop using. Opioid withdrawal can be especially uncomfortable and severe, especially if done alone.

  • Withdrawal symptoms may include:
  • Increased cravings for opioids
  • Mood swings, including anger, anxiety, and depression
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Shaking, feeling cold, and other flu-like symptoms
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle and bone pain
  • Increased blood pressure and heart rate
  • Abdominal issues, vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration

The intense cravings coupled with the sometimes brutal side effects can lead to relapse, and since a user’s tolerance has changed during withdrawal, they’re much more likely to overdose. This withdrawal period, known as “dope sickness,” can have other health risks, particularly when illness and dehydration occur while the person in withdrawal is unsupervised. Opioid withdrawal generally lasts 3-5 days, but can take as many as ten.

Some people who quit opioids suffer from a long-term condition called post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS), where one or more of the above symptoms can last for many months. This is part of the reason we recommend someone in recovery enter opioid addiction treatment programming, so that they can identify and get the help they need.

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Opioid Abuse Treatment Near Cleveland, Ohio

At Prosperity Haven, we provide compassionate, individualized treatment for opioid abuse that makes the most of our combination of evidence-based and holistic therapies. Clients are given the chance to invest in their own recovery, work with their peers to form a lasting brotherhood, and access comprehensive addiction recovery services that meets them where they are.

To learn more about our Cleveland-area substance abuse rehab center, call Prosperity Haven at 440-253-9915 or click here to explore our treatment programs today.