Prosperity Haven

Xanax Addiction Treatment
in Chardon, OH

Overview:
Ohio Xanax Abuse & Addiction Recovery

Xanax is one of the most abused and easiest to obtain sedative-hypnotic drugs throughout Ohio [1]. It can be an important medication in helping manage anxiety and related issues, but it also comes with high risks for abuse and dangerous health complications — especially when combined with other substances.

At Prosperity Haven, we empower our clients and their loved ones through education. Knowing the enemy is half the battle, after all. Read on to learn more about Xanax: what it is, why it’s dangerous to combine with other substances, symptoms of use and withdrawal, and how our Xanax addiction treatment can help you or a loved one find a fulfilling, happier, healthier life in recovery.

What is Xanax?

What is Xanax?

Xanax is one of the most commonly-prescribed benzodiazepines, or “benzos,” a class of drugs which suppress the central nervous system.

While different benzodiazepines can treat everything from seizures to alcohol withdrawal, Xanax — which is the brand name for alprazolam — is mainly prescribed as an antipsychotic to treat anxiety, panic disorders, and sometimes insomnia.

Xanax is one of the fastest-acting benzodiazepines, with a shorter duration of effect, making it one of the most potent and addictive of these substances. It is usually taken orally, or crushed and then snorted, and goes by the names “bars,” “blues,” “ladders,” “xans”, and “zanies.”

What is Xanax?

Xanax is one of the most commonly prescribed benzodiazepines, or “benzos,” a class of drugs which suppress the central nervous system.

While different benzodiazepines can treat everything from seizures to alcohol withdrawal, Xanax — which is the brand name for alprazolam — is mainly prescribed as an antipsychotic to treat anxiety, panic disorders, and sometimes insomnia.

Xanax is one of the fastest-acting benzodiazepines, with a shorter duration of effect, making it one of the most potent and addictive of these substances. It is usually taken orally, or crushed and then snorted, and goes by the names “bars,” “blues,” “ladders,” “xans”, and “zanies.”

Abusing Xanax With Other Drugs

Benzodiazepines like Xanax are often combined with other substances when abused, which can be far more dangerous and damaging to the body.

Benzodiazepines are sometimes combined with alcohol, because they suppress the same part of the central nervous system by generating more GABA, boosting each other’s effects. High amounts of GABA repress both heart rate and respiratory function, leading to potentially life-threatening outcomes.

Similarly, benzodiazepines are sometimes used to “enhance” the high from opioid pain medication, but increase the already intense withdrawal and overdose symptoms of opioids, including suppressed breathing. Almost 1 in 4 people who died from an opioid overdose in 2015 also tested positive for benzodiazepines [2].

Xanax Abuse

Abusing Xanax With Other Drugs

Benzodiazepines like Xanax are often combined with other substances when abused, which can be far more dangerous and damaging to the body.

Benzodiazepines are sometimes combined with alcohol, because they suppress the same part of the central nervous system by generating more GABA, boosting each other’s effects. High amounts of GABA repress both heart rate and respiratory function, leading to potentially life-threatening outcomes.

Similarly, benzodiazepines are sometimes used to “enhance” the high from opioid pain medication, but increase the already intense withdrawal and overdose symptoms of opioids, including suppressed breathing. Almost 1 in 4 people who died from an opioid overdose in 2015 also tested positive for benzodiazepines. [2]

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Xanax Addiction Abuse Symptoms

Signs and Symptoms of Xanax Addiction

Xanax is often prescribed before it is abused, and one way to identify Xanax abuse is to look closely at the user’s behavior. Are they lying about use? Does it seem like they get less effect from their prescription? Do they go through their prescription rather quickly? If they’ve lost access to their prescription, have they borrowed or stolen money to get more Xanax? Answering “yes” to any of these questions may indicate a serious Xanax addiction.

Other symptoms and signs of Xanax addiction include:

  • Mental issues: Fluctuating anxiety, panic attacks, low libido, depression, suicidal thinking
  • Confusion: Poor memory, bad coordination, dizziness, drowsiness, lightheadedness
  • Physical signs: Headaches, insomnia, dry mouth, fatigue, poor reaction times
  • Stomach problem: Low or high appetite, nausea, constipation, vomiting, fluctuating weight
  • New behaviors: Engaging in risky acts; problems with work, school, money, or the law; spending time with new people; no longer doing things they used to love
  • Health risks: Seizures, breathing issues, heartbeat or blood pressure problems, jaundice, weakness, fainting, coma

Signs and Symptoms of Xanax Addiction

Xanax is often prescribed before it is abused, and one way to identify Xanax abuse is to look closely at the user’s behavior. Are they lying about use? Does it seem like they get less effect from their prescription? Do they go through their prescription rather quickly? If they’ve lost access to their prescription, have they borrowed or stolen money to get more Xanax? Answering “yes” to any of these questions may indicate a serious Xanax addiction.

Other symptoms and signs of Xanax addiction include:

  • Mental issues: Fluctuating anxiety, panic attacks, low libido, depression, suicidal thinking
  • Confusion: Poor memory, bad coordination, dizziness, drowsiness, lightheadedness
  • Physical signs: Headaches, insomnia, dry mouth, fatigue, poor reaction times
  • Stomach problem: Low or high appetite, nausea, constipation, vomiting, fluctuating weight
  • New behaviors: Engaging in risky acts; problems with work, school, money, or the law; spending time with new people; no longer doing things they used to love
  • Health risks: Seizures, breathing issues, heartbeat or blood pressure problems, jaundice, weakness, fainting, coma

Xanax Detox and Withdrawal

While all benzodiazepines have withdrawal, Xanax withdrawal is uniquely intense. One review [3] found that some side-effects of Xanax withdrawal either aren’t as intense from other benzodiazepines, or are exclusive to Xanax withdrawal, such as:

  • Delirium
  • Psychosis
  • Recurring, or even increased, panic attacks
  • High levels of adrenaline
  • Drastic fluctuations in blood pressure
  • Drastic fluctuations in heartbeat
Xanax Detox and Withdrawal

Xanax Detox and Withdrawal

While all benzodiazepines have withdrawal, Xanax withdrawal is uniquely intense. One review [3] found that some side-effects of Xanax withdrawal either aren’t as intense from other benzodiazepines, or are exclusive to Xanax withdrawal, such as:

  • Delirium
  • Psychosis
  • Recurring, or even increased, panic attacks
  • High levels of adrenaline
  • Drastic fluctuations in blood pressure
  • Drastic fluctuations in heartbeat
  • Other withdrawal symptoms common across most benzodiazepines include:
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Irritability and anger
  • Insomnia and nightmares
  • Poor coordination
  • Nausea, vomiting, and sweating
  • Seizures
  • Cramping and muscle tension
  • Fainting and coma

How long and intense withdrawal is depends on how long Xanax was being used, the dosage, whether it was mixed with other substances, and the user. Xanax withdrawal can take a few days to set in, but symptoms can last two weeks to several months, and some people experience Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS) where a symptom persists for one or two years. We don’t recommend that anyone try to stop using Xanax alone; professional help can mitigate the most serious symptoms and health risks.

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Xanax Addiction Treatment Near Cleveland, OH

Quitting Xanax is a challenge in and of itself, but truly getting a handle on the long-term side-effects and cravings associated with Xanax addiction has its own obstacles. That’s why we provide personalized Xanax addiction treatment with individualized recovery plans, small groups, frequent one-on-one substance abuse counseling, and a combination of evidence-based and nature-based therapies that get to the root of addiction and heal the mind, body, and spirit.

We believe this personal approach to Xanax addiction is crucial to successful recovery, and we’ve been able to change many people’s lives and help them live happier — and sober — after rehab. To learn more about Xanax addiction treatment, call Prosperity Haven at (440) 253-9915 today.