Prosperity Haven

Cocaine Addiction Treatment
and Recovery in Chardon, OH

Overview:
Chardon Cocaine Abuse & Addiction Recovery

Cocaine is an increasingly common — and increasingly dangerous — drug in Ohio and throughout the country. In 2018, it was estimated that about 2% of the US population used cocaine in the last year [1]. Meanwhile, in Ohio, cocaine overdose deaths have dramatically increased over the last two decades, with 14 times more cocaine overdose deaths in 2017 than in 2000 [2].

At Prosperity Haven, we believe it’s important that our clients and their loved ones understand all the risks of cocaine abuse. Below, you can learn more about how cocaine addiction works, and how our dedicated recovery staff can help our clients overcome this challenging substance use disorder.

What is Cocaine?

What Is Cocaine?

Cocaine is a potent and addictive stimulant drug that can cause feelings of euphoria and confidence when abused. Cocaine works by interfering with the reward system in the brain, leading to a release of dopamine and a resulting rush of euphoria. This high is often short-lived, lasting only 5-30 minutes, which can lead to a user quickly developing a tolerance and becoming dependent on the drug.

Cocaine comes in two forms. The first, a powder-like salt that is snorted or injected, goes by the names “coke,” “snow,” “blow,” and “powder.” On the street, powder cocaine is often diluted, or “cut,” by non-drug powders or cheaper substances to make the seller more money, some of which can be harmful to the body. The second form is cocaine base, a solid often called “crack” or “rock” that is smoked. Mixing cocaine with heroin is extremely dangerous, but common enough to be given the nickname, “speedballing.”

What Is Cocaine?

Cocaine is a potent and addictive stimulant drug that can cause feelings of euphoria and confidence when abused. Cocaine works by interfering with the reward system in the brain, leading to a release of dopamine and a resulting rush of euphoria. This high is often short-lived, lasting only 5-30 minutes, which can lead to a user quickly developing a tolerance and becoming dependent on the drug.

Cocaine comes in two forms. The first, a powder-like salt that is snorted or injected, goes by the names “coke,” “snow,” “blow,” and “powder.” On the street, powder cocaine is often diluted, or “cut,” by non-drug powders or cheaper substances to make the seller more money, some of which can be harmful to the body. The second form is cocaine base, a solid often called “crack” or “rock” that is smoked. Mixing cocaine with heroin is extremely dangerous, but common enough to be given the nickname, “speedballing.”

Mixing Cocaine with Other Substances

In 2013, over half of the people who sought treatment for cocaine addiction used cocaine with other substances [3]. For example, cocaine is used with alcohol or heroin, due in part to the belief that the sedative effects of alcohol or heroin, and stimulant effects of cocaine, cancel each other out. In reality, using these substances together puts tremendous strain on the body, especially the heart, and can cause the user to stop breathing. Cocaine is also sometimes combined with other stimulants like MDMA, which makes their side effects even more damaging and potentially lethal.

Mixing Cocaine with Other Substances

In 2013, over half of the people who sought treatment for cocaine addiction used cocaine with other substances [3]. For example, cocaine is used with alcohol or heroin, due in part to the belief that the sedative effects of alcohol or heroin, and stimulant effects of cocaine, cancel each other out. In reality, using these substances together puts tremendous strain on the body, especially the heart, and can cause the user to stop breathing. Cocaine is also sometimes combined with other stimulants like MDMA, which makes their side effects even more damaging and potentially lethal.

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Signs and Symptoms of Cocaine Addiction

Signs and Symptoms of Cocaine Addiction

While every case of addiction is unique, most cocaine addictions will exhibit several of these signs:

  • Increased sensitivity: Greater sensitivity to touch, sound, sight, and pain
  • Dramatic mood swings: Alternating euphoria, irritability, excitability, restlessness, and paranoia
  • Physical signs: Dilated pupils, weight loss, poor hygiene, sexual trouble
  • New behaviors: Self-isolation, risky behaviors with unwarranted confidence, excessive talking, different sleep patterns, less appetite, not participating in activities once enjoyed
  • New problems: Developing new issues with finances, jobs, or the law
  • Signs depending on the method of use: runny or bloody nose, burn marks around the hands or mouth, white powder on self and clothing, paraphernalia like spoons, razors, and plastic baggies

Signs and Symptoms of Cocaine Addiction

While every case of addiction is unique, most cocaine addictions will exhibit several of these signs:

  • Increased sensitivity: Greater sensitivity to touch, sound, sight, and pain
  • Dramatic mood swings: Alternating euphoria, irritability, excitability, restlessness, and paranoia
  • Physical signs: Dilated pupils, weight loss, poor hygiene, sexual trouble
  • New behaviors: Self-isolation, risky behaviors with unwarranted confidence, excessive talking, different sleep patterns, less appetite, not participating in activities once enjoyed
  • New problems: Developing new issues with finances, jobs, or the law
  • Signs depending on the method of use: runny or bloody nose, burn marks around the hands or mouth, white powder on self and clothing, paraphernalia like spoons, razors, and plastic baggies

Effects of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

Cocaine warps the brain’s reward system, which both makes the user more sensitive and stressed, and makes other sources of good feelings — relationships, exercise, sleep, food, and others — less potent a source of dopamine than cocaine. Unfortunately, this means many people will turn away from their loved ones or health in order to chase their most potent source of pleasure, their substance use disorder. This can lead to other mental health problems, such as anxiety, paranoia, and psychosis.

Cocaine damages the brain, heart, and stomach with long-term use, leading to an increased risk of gastrointestinal tears, heart muscle inflammation, aortic ruptures, stroke, heart attack, seizures, Parkinson’s disease, and comas. If used during pregnancy, it can also cause developmental problems in children, from physical problems due to premature birth to cognitive and attention deficiencies later in life.

Depending on how it is taken, cocaine can damage other bodily structures as well. Snorting the drug can damage the nose, throat, and bowels. Injecting cocaine is especially dangerous to the heart and increases the risk of contracting hepatitis C, HIV, and other bloodborne diseases. Smoking crack cocaine wreaks havoc on the lungs, especially for anyone with a breathing problem like asthma.

Effects of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

Cocaine warps the brain’s reward system, which both makes the user more sensitive and stressed, and makes other sources of good feelings — relationships, exercise, sleep, food, and others — less potent a source of dopamine than cocaine. Unfortunately, this means many people will turn away from their loved ones or health in order to chase their most potent source of pleasure, their substance use disorder. This can lead to other mental health problems, such as anxiety, paranoia, and psychosis.

Cocaine damages the brain, heart, and stomach with long-term use, leading to an increased risk of gastrointestinal tears, heart muscle inflammation, aortic ruptures, stroke, heart attack, seizures, Parkinson’s disease, and comas. If used during pregnancy, it can also cause developmental problems in children, from physical problems due to premature birth to cognitive and attention deficiencies later in life.

Depending on how it is taken, cocaine can damage other bodily structures as well. Snorting the drug can damage the nose, throat, and bowels. Injecting cocaine is especially dangerous to the heart and increases the risk of contracting hepatitis C, HIV, and other bloodborne diseases. Smoking crack cocaine wreaks havoc on the lungs, especially for anyone with a breathing problem like asthma.

Cocaine Detox and Withdrawal

Cocaine Detox & Withdrawal

Compared to other substances, cocaine’s symptoms affect the mind more than the body. However, this doesn’t make them any less dangerous. Symptoms of cocaine withdrawal include:

  • Poor focus and critical thinking
  • Exhaustion coupled with restlessness and trouble sleeping
  • Mood swings, depression, anxiety, irritability, and paranoia
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Nightmares
  • Physical symptoms such as chills, tremors, and aches and pains
  • Anhedonia, or difficulty feeling pleasure
  • Cravings for cocaine

While the withdrawal period for cocaine is relatively short, starting as quickly as 90 minutes after last use and ending 7 to 10 days later, it can be very intense and unpleasant enough to lead to relapse. Cocaine addiction relapse can be especially dangerous, as the body’s reaction to cocaine changes when not using, leading to risk of overdose to get the same effects.

It’s also worth noting that cocaine withdrawal symptoms, particularly intense cravings and anhedonia, can persist or reemerge for many months and even years. This makes relapse prevention key for cocaine addiction treatment, since triggers can cause powerful cocaine cravings well after the withdrawal period has ended.

Cocaine Detox & Withdrawal

Compared to other substances, cocaine’s symptoms affect the mind more than the body. However, this doesn’t make them any less dangerous. Symptoms of cocaine withdrawal include:

  • Poor focus and critical thinking
  • Exhaustion coupled with restlessness and trouble sleeping
  • Mood swings, depression, anxiety, irritability, and paranoia
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Nightmares
  • Physical symptoms such as chills, tremors, and aches and pains
  • Anhedonia, or difficulty feeling pleasure
  • Cravings for cocaine

While the withdrawal period for cocaine is relatively short, starting as quickly as 90 minutes after last use and ending 7 to 10 days later, it can be very intense and unpleasant enough to lead to relapse. Cocaine addiction relapse can be especially dangerous, as the body’s reaction to cocaine changes when not using, leading to risk of overdose to get the same effects.

It’s also worth noting that cocaine withdrawal symptoms, particularly intense cravings and anhedonia, can persist or reemerge for many months and even years. This makes relapse prevention key for cocaine addiction treatment, since triggers can cause powerful cocaine cravings well after the withdrawal period has ended.

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Cocaine Addiction Treatment in Cleveland

Cocaine addiction isn’t just something that a user is free from once the withdrawal period ends. Depending on how frequently they’ve been using, and the underlying reasons behind their use, their dependence on cocaine can be difficult to overcome.

At Prosperity Haven, we believe the solution is to provide individualized, comprehensive care that takes the client’s whole health and future into account during treatment. Our one-on-one substance abuse therapy unpacks the root causes of the addiction, while our nature-based therapy help clients rebuild their total health and find pleasure in simple routines. We only work with small groups of men at a time to ensure that every client gets the attentive care, individualized treatment, and life planning they need to succeed in recovery.

To learn more about our cocaine addiction treatment programs at Prosperity Haven, call us at 440-253-9915 today.